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Baz Bahadur and Rupmati Riding Horses and with Hunting Falcons

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In the center of the painting, in an open, green field, is Rupmati. She is shown wearing a red-orange turban with a gold sash and a long red-orange dress with a slit down the chest. Her long black hair falls past her back. With her left hand she holds the reigns of her brown horse, while her left hand wears a glove and supports a white falcon. Riding beside her on a gray and white dappled horse with henna-dyed legs is Baz Bahadur. He wears a pink turban with a gold sash and a long pink robe. His left hand gestures in conversation, while his right hand supports a white falcon. Rupmati and Baz Bahadur gaze into each other’s eyes. Rupmati was a Hindu shepherdess and a singer. Once out hunting, Baz Bahadur, the last Sultan of Malwa in present-day Madhya Pradesh (r. 1555-1562) heard her melodious voice and was enchanted by her beauty. They both fell in love and were married according to both Hindu and Muslim rites. Pahari style.
Department of Islamic & Later Indian Art Stuart Cary Welch (by 1983 - 2008 ) by descent; to his estate (2008-2009 ) gift; to Harvard Art Museum. Notes: Object was part of long-term loan to Museum in 1983. Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum The Stuart Cary Welch Collection Gift of Edith I. Welch in memory of Stuart Cary Welch
Title: Baz Bahadur and Rupmati Riding Horses and with Hunting Falcons
Description:
In the center of the painting, in an open, green field, is Rupmati.
She is shown wearing a red-orange turban with a gold sash and a long red-orange dress with a slit down the chest.
Her long black hair falls past her back.
With her left hand she holds the reigns of her brown horse, while her left hand wears a glove and supports a white falcon.
Riding beside her on a gray and white dappled horse with henna-dyed legs is Baz Bahadur.
He wears a pink turban with a gold sash and a long pink robe.
His left hand gestures in conversation, while his right hand supports a white falcon.
Rupmati and Baz Bahadur gaze into each other’s eyes.
Rupmati was a Hindu shepherdess and a singer.
Once out hunting, Baz Bahadur, the last Sultan of Malwa in present-day Madhya Pradesh (r.
1555-1562) heard her melodious voice and was enchanted by her beauty.
They both fell in love and were married according to both Hindu and Muslim rites.
Pahari style.

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