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Palaeolithic Paintings—Magdalenian Period

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If we mark upon a map the sites of those caves and rock-shelters which contain examples of palaeolithic paintings and drawings we find that in the Franco–Cantabrian region (which comprises southwest France and northwest Spain) they fall naturally into three well-defined groups, the particular district in which each group is situated being decided accidentally, or rather geologically, by the occurrence within it of a number of limestone caverns no great distance from each other. And when we make a more detailed study of these groups we find that there is in each group one cave wherein the art of the district is at its best—a cave that we may consider the art-centre of its district. The three cave-groups in question are to be found respectively in the Dordogne district, of which the outstanding cave is Font de Gaume; in the northern Pyrenees district, wherein most of the best art can be found at Niaux ; and in the Cantabrian district of northwest Spain, where the cave of Altamira is pre-eminent by reason of its wonderful painted ceiling.
Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Title: Palaeolithic Paintings—Magdalenian Period
Description:
If we mark upon a map the sites of those caves and rock-shelters which contain examples of palaeolithic paintings and drawings we find that in the Franco–Cantabrian region (which comprises southwest France and northwest Spain) they fall naturally into three well-defined groups, the particular district in which each group is situated being decided accidentally, or rather geologically, by the occurrence within it of a number of limestone caverns no great distance from each other.
And when we make a more detailed study of these groups we find that there is in each group one cave wherein the art of the district is at its best—a cave that we may consider the art-centre of its district.
The three cave-groups in question are to be found respectively in the Dordogne district, of which the outstanding cave is Font de Gaume; in the northern Pyrenees district, wherein most of the best art can be found at Niaux ; and in the Cantabrian district of northwest Spain, where the cave of Altamira is pre-eminent by reason of its wonderful painted ceiling.

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