Search engine for discovering works of Art, research articles, and books related to Art and Culture
ShareThis
Javascript must be enabled to continue!

The Hellenic Literary Society at Constantinople between Ottomanism and Greek Irredentism

View through CrossRef
"… the Turks, public servants or soldiers, remained in sum what they’ve always been, Barbarians making a life out of plunder and robbery..." The above statement reveals how one of the finest institutions of Ottoman Greek letters and sciences, the Hellenic Literary Society at Constantinople, described the Turks in a petition to its honorary members, academics, university professors, and learned societies in the Allied countries and in those that had remained neutral during the Great War, just a month into the deliberations of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. The picture of the Turk as a barbarian permeates the petition and juxtaposes that of the Greek as the bearer of civilization. In this way, the society attempted to elicit the support of Western intellectuals in favor of Greek irredentism. Such an approach was not unique to the Ottoman Greeks, as Armenians also employed a similar distinction between the Turks and themselves to enhance their national aspirations.2 Yet, such a snapshot of the society in the post-Armistice period can be misleading as to its sixty-odd year-long lifetime. The society had remained, for the most part, in favor of Ottomanism, and its endorsement of Greek irredentism tells us more about how and why multi-ethnic and multi-cultural empires can fail rather than providing an accurate depiction of the society throughout its existence.
Title: The Hellenic Literary Society at Constantinople between Ottomanism and Greek Irredentism
Description:
"… the Turks, public servants or soldiers, remained in sum what they’ve always been, Barbarians making a life out of plunder and robbery.
" The above statement reveals how one of the finest institutions of Ottoman Greek letters and sciences, the Hellenic Literary Society at Constantinople, described the Turks in a petition to its honorary members, academics, university professors, and learned societies in the Allied countries and in those that had remained neutral during the Great War, just a month into the deliberations of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919.
The picture of the Turk as a barbarian permeates the petition and juxtaposes that of the Greek as the bearer of civilization.
In this way, the society attempted to elicit the support of Western intellectuals in favor of Greek irredentism.
Such an approach was not unique to the Ottoman Greeks, as Armenians also employed a similar distinction between the Turks and themselves to enhance their national aspirations.
2 Yet, such a snapshot of the society in the post-Armistice period can be misleading as to its sixty-odd year-long lifetime.
The society had remained, for the most part, in favor of Ottomanism, and its endorsement of Greek irredentism tells us more about how and why multi-ethnic and multi-cultural empires can fail rather than providing an accurate depiction of the society throughout its existence.

Related Results

Physician and miracle worker. The cult of Saint Sampson the Xenodochos and his images in eastern Orthodox medieval painting
Physician and miracle worker. The cult of Saint Sampson the Xenodochos and his images in eastern Orthodox medieval painting
Saint Sampson, whose feast is celebrated on June 27, was depicted among holy physicians. However, his images were not frequent. He was usually accompanied with Saint Mokios (...
The Society of 27 Book Lovers (1930-1940): Membership, Relationships, Atmosphere
The Society of 27 Book Lovers (1930-1940): Membership, Relationships, Atmosphere
The Society of 27 Book Lovers in Kaunas that functioned in 1930–1940 played an important role in the history of Lithuanian culture. It signified the outset of the organized bibliop...
Gurdjieff in Constantinople
Gurdjieff in Constantinople
Abstract George Gurdjieff (1866–1949) and his students’ stay in Constantinople in 1920–1921 remains a blank spot in the movement’s history. Very few records relating to this pe...
Maailmakirjanduse mõõtmisest meil ja mujal / Conceptualizations of World Literature in Estonia and Elsewhere
Maailmakirjanduse mõõtmisest meil ja mujal / Conceptualizations of World Literature in Estonia and Elsewhere
Teesid: Artikkel käsitleb maailmakirjanduse mõiste mahu ja sisu muutumist alates selle esilekerkimisest 19. sajandi algupoolel kuni tänapäeva käsitlusviisideni ja dilemmadeni, mill...
A Factory of Magnificence: Themistius, Thucydides, and Constantinople
A Factory of Magnificence: Themistius, Thucydides, and Constantinople
In Themistius’orations there are many clear and direct references to the Greek literature of the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. However, there are also more subtle references to these ...
SEMANTIC COUNTERPOINT AND THE POETRY OF GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS
SEMANTIC COUNTERPOINT AND THE POETRY OF GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS
IT IS WELL KNOWN that both traditional, historically orientated, literary criticism and new-critical studies were inseparable from a belief in the “unity” of meaning – a belief in ...
Constantinople as 'New Rome'
Constantinople as 'New Rome'
<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:DocumentProperties> <o:Revision>0</o:Revision> <o:TotalTime>0</o:TotalTime> <o:Pages>1</o:Pages> &...
The Analysis of the Relationship between God, Religion and Politics in Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan and De Cive
The Analysis of the Relationship between God, Religion and Politics in Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan and De Cive
Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) was a significant political theorist who could be regarded as the founder of social contract theories. Hobbes’s philosophy is worthy of attention in the h...

Back to Top