Search engine for discovering works of Art, research articles, and books related to Art and Culture
ShareThis
Javascript must be enabled to continue!

Ten Thousand Bamboo in Mist and Rain

View through Harvard Museums
Because it retains its leaves year round, even during the cold winter season, the bamboo symbolizes strength in the face of adversity; paired with the pine and plum, it is regarded as one of the "Three Friends of Winter." Confucians, in particular, see the bamboo as an appropriate symbol of the cultured gentleman, and hence, it became a popular subject of scholar-amateur painting. This long handscroll depicts a species of bamboo noteworthy for its slender stalks and leaves. Growing on the bank of a river, the bamboo are enveloped by heavy mists that virtually obscure the plants in the background. The artist, Jin Yanhui, specialized in paintings of ink bamboo and was particularly fond of depicting slender bamboo. Thirteen inscriptions by scholars and officials, some of whom were his contemporaries, are written on the painting. The artist's own dated inscription appears at the end of the scroll.
Department of Asian Art Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum Edward B. Bruce Collection of Chinese Paintings; Gift of Galen L. Stone
Title: Ten Thousand Bamboo in Mist and Rain
Description:
Because it retains its leaves year round, even during the cold winter season, the bamboo symbolizes strength in the face of adversity; paired with the pine and plum, it is regarded as one of the "Three Friends of Winter.
" Confucians, in particular, see the bamboo as an appropriate symbol of the cultured gentleman, and hence, it became a popular subject of scholar-amateur painting.
This long handscroll depicts a species of bamboo noteworthy for its slender stalks and leaves.
Growing on the bank of a river, the bamboo are enveloped by heavy mists that virtually obscure the plants in the background.
The artist, Jin Yanhui, specialized in paintings of ink bamboo and was particularly fond of depicting slender bamboo.
Thirteen inscriptions by scholars and officials, some of whom were his contemporaries, are written on the painting.
The artist's own dated inscription appears at the end of the scroll.

Related Results

Bamboo through the Four Seasons
Bamboo through the Four Seasons
Korean folding screens often have six panels, like those painted in Japan; more characteristically, however, Korean screens boast eight, ten, or even twelve panels. In some cases, ...
Bamboo in Mist
Bamboo in Mist
Mounted as a hanging scroll, this long, rectangular painting by Kim Kyu-chin is executed in ink on silk and depicts bamboo in mist. The several very slender stalks of bamboo rise f...
Foil
Foil
On a violet background, vertical lines of green bamboo with branches of flowering trees between them. In the foreground, large reishi mushrooms in blue or brown, sharply outlined i...
Abandoned Skiff
Abandoned Skiff
Frederic Church, one of the leading landscape artists of the Hudson River School, produced an outstanding gallery of pictures both of his own country and of the different exotic la...
Panorama
Panorama
This horizontally oriented wall scroll presents an up-close view of a mountainous landscape. Three series of peaks recede directly into the compositional space, one at the left edg...
Bamboo in wind and rain
Bamboo in wind and rain
Hanging scroll; ink on paper, Qing dynasty (1644–1911), China...
Peace Score (Heiwa no fu)
Peace Score (Heiwa no fu)
Set of two framed bamboo panels; timber bamboo rattan and metal, Showa period (1926–1989), Japan...
Buddhist Priest's Robe (Kesa) with Decoration of Bamboo and Ornamented Fans
Buddhist Priest's Robe (Kesa) with Decoration of Bamboo and Ornamented Fans
A Buddhist priest's robe known in Japan as a kesa (Sanskrit, kasaya), this rectangular garment is made up of mulitple pieces of the same cloth that together form a patchwork of rec...

Back to Top