Search engine for discovering works of Art, research articles, and books related to Art and Culture
ShareThis
Javascript must be enabled to continue!

Writing from the other side: Critical reflections on the calligraphy of Zhang Qiang

View through CrossRef
This article presents the specific case of a contemporary practitioner of Chinese calligraphy, Zhang Qiang, who is a notable figure within the current Avant-Garde movement. After outlining aspects of his practice, which has been controversial along gender grounds, the article turns to his specific project of ‘bi-directional’ calligraphy. It is argued this work opens up a more rewarding way into his work as an enquiry into writing, which bears connections with Derrida’s deconstructionist account of writing and trace. However, in a brief exchange at Tate Modern, Zhang offers a form of ‘writing lesson’, which both helps takes us towards the decontructionist account of general writing, yet equally reveals a reliance upon the cultural category of ‘Chinese calligraphy’, which takes us away again – arguably symptomatic of a wider struggle for Chinese contemporary art to gain recognition in the West.
Title: Writing from the other side: Critical reflections on the calligraphy of Zhang Qiang
Description:
This article presents the specific case of a contemporary practitioner of Chinese calligraphy, Zhang Qiang, who is a notable figure within the current Avant-Garde movement.
After outlining aspects of his practice, which has been controversial along gender grounds, the article turns to his specific project of ‘bi-directional’ calligraphy.
It is argued this work opens up a more rewarding way into his work as an enquiry into writing, which bears connections with Derrida’s deconstructionist account of writing and trace.
However, in a brief exchange at Tate Modern, Zhang offers a form of ‘writing lesson’, which both helps takes us towards the decontructionist account of general writing, yet equally reveals a reliance upon the cultural category of ‘Chinese calligraphy’, which takes us away again – arguably symptomatic of a wider struggle for Chinese contemporary art to gain recognition in the West.

Related Results

Dostoevsky’s Calligraphy: Problems of Study
Dostoevsky’s Calligraphy: Problems of Study
The article is devoted to the problems of studying Dostoevsky’s calligraphy. The first paragraph discusses the historical and theoretical aspects of handwriting studies, as well as...
Forewarned is forearmed: The brave new world of (Creative) Writing online
Forewarned is forearmed: The brave new world of (Creative) Writing online
Online Writing courses, including Creative Writing programs, have been delivered in Australia for more than a decade. While most providers of online writing programs offer units in...
The Other Writing Group: an embodied workshop Abstract:
The Other Writing Group: an embodied workshop Abstract:
New insights and approaches to creative activity grounded in embodiment have the potential to enhance creative writing practices by focusing on the embodied dimensions of writing, ...
Chinese Calligraphy as “Force-Form”
Chinese Calligraphy as “Force-Form”
AbstractThis article explains the xing (form) of Chinese calligraphy, proposing that calligraphic xing is inseparable from shi (force), a key aesthetic concept in Chinese calligrap...
The night writer: The emergence of nocturnal travel writing
The night writer: The emergence of nocturnal travel writing
In 1762, the philosopher and writer Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote in Emile (1979) that we are blind half our lives because of what we miss during the night. The notion that the night...
Art-Historical Fiction or Fictional Art History?
Art-Historical Fiction or Fictional Art History?
Abstract In 1634 Zhang Taijie (b. 1588) published a woodblock edition of Baohuilu (A Record of Treasured Paintings), an extensive catalog of a massive painting colle...
The Death of Heroes in China
The Death of Heroes in China
This article examines Hero and House of Flying Daggers, Zhang Yimou's first forays into the martial arts/action genre, against the shifting cultural landscape in contemporary China...
Calligraphy of the thought: Drawing and writing in Vittorio Gregotti
Calligraphy of the thought: Drawing and writing in Vittorio Gregotti
This paper focuses on the close correlation between drawing and writing in the architecture of Vittorio Gregotti, in order to understand how both constitute symbiotic tools for his...

Back to Top