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Danilo Kish's Fictional Self аnd the Father's Figure („Garden. Ashes“ and „Hourglass“)

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The article examines two novels from the trilogy of Danilo Kish ("Early Care", "Garden, ashes" and the Hourglass) - a writer and essayist, the descendant of a Hungarian Jew and a Montenegrin mother. Both in his novels and in his essays and short stories, the centre of many cultures and identities, a follower of Kafka, Joyce, the Tick and whose main themes always carry the shade of nostalgia, the marks of the vanished world, which is experienced as the only thing dear to the artist. The theme of the disappearing world of Hungarian Jews is told from three different points of view in the trilogy. For the unfortified Self in the trilogy, the disappearance of the father is connected with the wavering of the identity, with the search for grounds for the very existence. From the narration of horror, the apocalyptic crack of life and meaning, the lurking death that transcends everything because it is finality. But amid the devastation and doubt of the written word, there remains the hope that the story provokes the reader, outlining the space and giving meaning to pain, sacrifice and death.
Southwest University Neofit Rilski
Title: Danilo Kish's Fictional Self аnd the Father's Figure („Garden. Ashes“ and „Hourglass“)
Description:
The article examines two novels from the trilogy of Danilo Kish ("Early Care", "Garden, ashes" and the Hourglass) - a writer and essayist, the descendant of a Hungarian Jew and a Montenegrin mother.
Both in his novels and in his essays and short stories, the centre of many cultures and identities, a follower of Kafka, Joyce, the Tick and whose main themes always carry the shade of nostalgia, the marks of the vanished world, which is experienced as the only thing dear to the artist.
The theme of the disappearing world of Hungarian Jews is told from three different points of view in the trilogy.
For the unfortified Self in the trilogy, the disappearance of the father is connected with the wavering of the identity, with the search for grounds for the very existence.
From the narration of horror, the apocalyptic crack of life and meaning, the lurking death that transcends everything because it is finality.
But amid the devastation and doubt of the written word, there remains the hope that the story provokes the reader, outlining the space and giving meaning to pain, sacrifice and death.

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